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Sparks

Power lines.
Sparks

The White House Has Some Transmission News Too

As if one set of energy policy announcements wasn’t enough.

Sparks

Biden’s $7 Billion Solar Bonanza

The Solar For All program is the final piece of the $27 billion Greenhouse Gas Reduction Fund.

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Forever Chemical Enforcement Just Got Even Stronger

In addition to regulating PFAS presence in water, the EPA will now target pollution at the source.

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A Quilt heat pump.

Sexier Heat Pumps Are Hitting the Market

The first Quilt units will be available to San Franciscans in just a few weeks.

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Oil machinery.

Why Oil Traders Are Not Freaking Out Today

Iran’s attack didn’t change much for markets.

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Solar panels.
<p>Heatmap Illustration/Getty Images</p>

Late last year, I wrote about an overlooked but potentially transformative program in the Inflation Reduction Act called the Climate Pollution Reduction Grants. Administered by the Environmental Protection Agency, it offered all 50 states, plus D.C. and Puerto Rico, an initial $3 million each for climate policy planning, spurring many states to develop emissions-cutting strategies for the first time. Later, cities and states will be able to apply for competitive grants from a $4.6 billion fund to implement elements of their plans.

States that accepted the planning money — i.e. all of them except Iowa, South Dakota, Florida, Wyoming, and Kentucky — agreed to submit an inventory of their greenhouse gas emissions and a list of actions they would prioritize to the EPA by March 1. All together, the plans ran to nearly 7,000 pages, which are now available on the EPA’s website for anyone to peruse. While I haven’t yet had a chance to read through them all myself, a new high-level analysis of the plans by the nonprofits Evergreen Collaborative, RMI, and Climate XChange shows where most states said they would focus their efforts.

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Does Climate Change Cause Earthquakes?

You can cross this one off your list of things to worry about.

A seismograph.
<p>Heatmap Illustration/Getty Images</p>

A 4.8 magnitude earthquake in New Jersey shook the ground and blew up my group chats this morning. It’s somewhat unusual, but not unheard of, to experience earthquakes in this part of the country, and some may be wondering, is this yet another extreme event that will become more likely under a changing climate?

The answer is maybe, but no one really knows yet.

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