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Electric Vehicles

Technology

AM Briefing: A Solar Energy Breakthrough?

On the future of solar, a meaty lawsuit, and microplastics

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Climate

AM Briefing: Texas on Fire

On the massive blazes, BYD's next move, and South Fork Wind

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Electric Vehicles

Electric Semis Are Hitting the Road in California

The vehicles are part of a pilot project aimed at trouble-shooting EV trucking.

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Flood Risk Is Hurting Texas Home Prices

AM Briefing: The Hefty Cost of Flood Risk Disclosure

On real estate in the era of climate change, Jeep EVs, and angry farmers

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Counting the Americans Displaced By Disaster

AM Briefing: The Americans Displaced By Disaster

On new Census Bureau data, Vineyard Wind, and kayaking in Death Valley

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Electric Vehicles

Why 2024 Is a Make or Break Year for Rivian

The all-American EV startup is cutting costs to survive.

A Rivian.
<p>Heatmap Illustration/Rivian</p>

America’s most interesting electric-vehicle company is about to have the defining year of its life.

On Wednesday, the company reported that it lost $1.58 billion in the fourth quarter of last year, bringing its net annual losses to $5.4 billion. It announced that it is laying off about 10% of its salaried employees, but — at the same time — promised that it has a plan to achieve a small profit by the end of this year.

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Politics

AM Briefing: SCOTUS Weighs Smog Rules

On being a good neighbor, Rivian’s results, and China’s emissions

Will SCOTUS Block a Major Air Pollution Rule?
Heatmap Illustration/Getty Images

Current conditions: Heavy rain caused extreme flooding outside Rio de Janeiro • Japan is enduring record-breaking warm winter weather • It’ll be 72 degrees Fahrenheit and sunny at Peoria Stadium in Arizona for the MLB’s first spring training game between the Los Angeles Dodgers and the San Diego Padres.

THE TOP FIVE

1. Supreme Court weighs challenge to EPA pollution rule

The Supreme Court this week has been hearing arguments in what CNN called “the most significant environmental dispute at the high court this year,” and things aren’t looking good for the Environmental Protection Agency. Several states and energy companies want to block the EPA’s “good neighbor” plan, which seeks to impose strict emissions limits on industrial activities in 23 states in an effort to prevent pollution from drifting across state lines and forming dangerous smog. Challengers say the regulation is overreaching and want its implementation delayed. Yesterday the court’s conservative majority appeared skeptical of the EPA’s authority, citing the fact that lower court decisions have paused the regulation in 12 states.

Environmental groups worry a ruling against the EPA here could set a dangerous precedent. “The Supreme Court — if it were to block this rule — would effectively be saying to industry, ‘Look, any time you face costs from a regulation, come on up and take a shot. We might block that rule for you,’” Sam Sankar, senior vice president for programs at Earthjustice, told E&E News.

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