Sign In or Create an Account.

By continuing, you agree to the Terms of Service and acknowledge our Privacy Policy

Economy

Briefing image.
Economy

AM Briefing: Biden’s Big Energy Moves

On the EPA’s power plant rules, the White House’s transmission boost, and a new BYD pickup.

Economy

American Solar Is in a Trade War With Itself

Manufacturers and installers have different opinions on tariffs.

Economy

Biden’s Climate Cash Is Finally Pouring In

To the tune of $37 billion in the past month alone.

Blue
What to Expect From Tesla’s Earnings Report

AM Briefing: Tesla’s Big Test

On low expectations, global EV demand, and heat domes

Yellow
Economy

AM Briefing: Fixing the Grid

On the “Transmission Interconnection Roadmap,” solar tariffs, and AI

The DOE Has a Plan to Speed Up New Grid Connections
Heatmap Illustration/Getty Images

Current conditions: Parts of Dubai remain waterlogged after this week’s epic rainfall • A volcanic eruption in Indonesia produced a 1.6-mile ash column • Severe thunderstorms are headed for the Midwest and Southern Plains.

THE TOP FIVE

1. DOE unveils roadmap to speed up clean energy grid connections

The Department of Energy yesterday unveiled its plans to help solve a problem plaguing the clean energy sector: the backlog of grid connections. According to Secretary of Energy Jennifer Granholm, nearly 12,000 solar, wind, and storage projects are ready and waiting to be connected to the grid. “The high volume of projects and inadequate existing procedures for interconnection has led to uncertainties, delays, inequities, and added costs for developers, consumers, utilities, and their regulators,” the DOE said in its announcement. The new “Transmission Interconnection Roadmap” aims to speed up connection times by providing more transparency on data for existing projects, creating fast-track options for interconnection, and adopting requirements and standards for generation interconnection, among other initiatives. The Biden administration has a goal of 100% clean electricity by 2035.

Keep reading...Show less
Politics

We Can’t Drill These Holes Fast Enough

The U.S. just made permitting easier for geothermal, but industry and lawmakers say we should be going farther.

A geothermal power station.
<p>Heatmap Illustration/Getty Images</p>

The federal government is really excited about geothermal: A Department of Energy report published in March said that geothermal can “become a key contributor to secure, domestic, decarbonized power generation for the U.S.” — particularly the kind of clean, always available power that grids love.

Big companies are really excited about geothermal: A group comprised of Google, Microsoft, and Nucor, the steel company, together put out a request in March for power projects that could generate clean power 24 hours a day, including “next-generation geothermal” (i.e. projects that don’t require finding hot water or steam underground, but instead use drilling to apply fluid to already hot rocks).

Keep reading...Show less